12.23 Studios

Lab Notes

(02/14/20)

[Note: This page will now only feature lab notes from the current episode. Previous notes are in the Archive...]

Ok, new week in the lab, working on the power plant and the bike...


Calibrating the new boost buck converters. I'm setting the output at 17V over 16V because that is the 'rated terminal voltage of the average 12V solar panel'...


I slowly set the current to 1.5A, looking for any sign of blue smoke...


Calibrating the second converter...


Current set, and a reminder to get another cheap multimeter...


After cleaning and resoldering my iron, I de-soldered and re-soldered the wires to the new converters...


The unit with the regular fuse holder will be installed to the board...


During the Thur. shakedown test, I read 1.5A from the run battery with just the power inverter connected...


With the phone charger connected, the current draw is 1.8A...


The fan motor at the highest setting only pumps the steady current draw up to a max of 3.2A; anything over 1.5A goes to the load taps...


With the laptop plugged in, the heavy 90W load spiked to just over 3A, then settled between 2.5-3A. No more 5-6A surges; the system is locked down and under control...


The bike trailer design, a DIY bamboo copy of the Burley Travoy trailer. While I search for bamboo, I can make a pvc mockup. Source: see YouTube and Instructable 'How to Build a Bicycle & Hiking Trailer with Bamboo - BooTec'...


The first two bamboo poles for the trailer - about 1.5" dia., 4 ft.long. Five poles should do it...


The rear rack is sitting far enough back that I could hang a big grocery store size bag off it and it just might clear the back of my feet. Changing the depth from 15.5" to 14" should fix that too...


I tested it out with a big shopping bag - placing the leading edge a few inches back on the rack looks cleared of the foot path, but in actual riding the foot sweeps well into the area. The pannier would have to ride high to clear...


My old tire pressure gauge was busted, but the bike shop only had digital models. Luckily the local REI had an analog gauge. This is in the low end of proper psi (35-65 psi). Front tire...


...And rear tire. The hand pump might get it up to 50 psi with lots of sweating, but on the road I could get it this far in a few minutes...


The system looked like this on Sat. - switches in the up or 'A to B' position, split positives going to the phantom 25W solar panel and the phantom 100W solar panel...


The analog ammeter connected to the output control switch reads about 700mA going into the charging battery as the run battery reads almost double the amp draw...


This is the voltage reading of the two batteries while the ammeter is connected...


The smaller boost buck converter needed a heat sink, so the wooden feet have to go...


insulation...


The output end placement...


The heat sink did actually help reduce the small amount of radiated heat from the component...


The current from the charge controller to the charging battery is the same 650-700 mA whether the load is my smartphone or the fan motor...


The Coefficient of Performance numbers from time testing with the two loads. Because the battery being tested will always output double or more the current it receives, the C of P should always be more than 1.1 in this circuit design...


The final C of P test with the laptop as the load - after a spike up to 3.14A, the current settled down to an avg. 2.5A...


The final numbers, which kinda turns a mountain into a stepping stone, even though battery C of P is still hotly debated in the 'free energy' community...


The straight-charge test on Wed. began with the topped off 'A' run battery and a practically flat 'B' charging battery...


These next pics from two short videos of the straight charge test - A few minutes into the test; the load readings of the batteries...


Input amps to 'B' battery around 650 mA...


Phone battery state...


A few minutes before ending the test at 3 hrs.; the load readings of the batteries...


Input amps to 'B' battery around 500-550 mA...


Phone battery charged...

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