12.23 Studios

Bike Shop

(09/23/22)

Ok, the Itinerary covers what I thought would be a bigger deal - comparing a lot of bikepacking and touring gear lists for what I was sure would be items missing from my own list, but no, aside from personal preferences in clothes, I'm 98% solid in essential gear. That means I can get on with sorting the different categories and figuring out where stuff goes...


The road repair fanny pack including patch kit, maintenance and spare parts bag, a few road wipes and nalgene bottle - this easily fits in one of the trunk bag half size panniers...


Bike Clothes: Short Jersey and base layer, Long Jersey and base layer, 3 pa. cycling underwear, 3 pa. cycling socks, Rain jacket and pants. Not shown - an Opsak for dirty bike clothes. All this stuffed into a water resistant plastic bag fits in the other half size pannier. No bike shorts, no spandex - I'll be wearing either cargo shorts or my comfortable bike jeans that are in the seat bag...

Meanwhile in the Log, the single task is concentrating on the trailer's electrical system - battery box, power plant and the 60W solar panel...


The first battery extension cables connected to the A Neg and A Pos lines of the power plant...


The B Neg and B Pos lines next, with the spade terminals insulated for safety...


The power plant control panel ready for travel inside the traiker...


The Grateful Red tail light is made by the company that made my rear bike rack...


The tail light arrived a few days later, looks and works fine. Added bonus is the rubber shim from the seat post mount, that can help whatever headlight I get...


...But it's missing the metal bracket of the 2-part rack mount. It's a minor irritation that could be easily fixed, and honestly, there are customer complaints that the metal is flimsy and breaks off at the hole, but actually, I didn't get this light to mount it to the rack...


I got this light for the clip that lets me attach it to the back of the trunk bag. Violent shaking doesn't dislodge it either, so I'm satisfied...


Simple run tests to check the lines and circuits of the power plant. It took a little jiggling of the powerpole connectors to get both meters lit, but then it ran 5 by 5. This is the control panel in A to B position...


The control panel in B to A position. I'm not quite ready to lock down the battery box lid, but this part of the electrical system is done...


This plastic D-ring is a weaker link than the front strap...


The rear strap will have less stress placed on it because it's more or less level with the eye nuts, but I'd rather not try running a cord or cable through it...


Luckily, Eco-Worthy included these carabiners as tie down anchors...


As a replacement for the plastic rings, the carabiners will help prevent the solar panel from becoming a sail in a stiff wind. A better option would be to treat wind like rain and not deploy the solar at all...


Double knotted short bungee cords are just taut enough to hold the front carabiners to the eye nuts...


This arrangement doesn't put undue stress on the straps. The hooks can also be closed up a bit to ensure they don't pop loose...


This bungee cord to support post connection also keeps the panel from becoming a sail...


The rear carabiners doing their job, simple and efficient. A bungee connecting the eye nuts should prevent lateral stress on the straps...


The solution to securing the solar panel to the trailer seems too easy, but I'll go with it for now. The top rail also needs to be wrapped in duct tape to prevent abrasion damage to the back of the panel...

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